rrriordan:

A ‘Code Name Verity’ story! @EWein2412  
obitoftheday:

Obit of the Day: Air Pioneer
Lettice Curtis had her pilot’s license for only three years when she was recruited to Britain’s Air Transport Auxiliary (ATA) in 1940. The ATA’s sole mission was to ferry aircraft in and around the British Isles to make them accessible for members of the Royal Air Force. A shortage of male pilots forced the ATA to invite women to join, and Ms. Curtis was one of the first.
She was also the best. During her five years of service Ms. Curtis transported more than 1500 aircraft. Everything from Spitfire fighter planes, to the two-engine multi-purpose Mosquito, to the Lancaster four-engine bomber, had to be flown by Ms. Curtis, often solo and using only a map for navigation. Ms. Curtis was, in fact, the first woman in the world to qualify to fly four-engine bombers including the American B-17 Flying Fortress. She gained national attention in October 1942 when she met and shook hands with Eleanor Roosevelt and Clementine Churchill. 
Ms. Curtis was one of 166 women served in the ATA, which was dubbed ”Always Terrified Airwomen” by cynical journalists when the program was first expanded. The pilots came not just from the United Kingdom but also the U.S., The Netherlands, and Poland. Fifteen women lost their lives while serving in the ATA, a remarkably low death rate for pilots asked to fly at all hours and in all types of weather.a
After the end of World War II, Ms. Curtis hoped to fly in a professional setting but with the end of the war came the end of a need for women pilots. Like so many other women of the era Ms. Curtis was pushed aside to make room for the men returning from the front. While interviewing for a test pilot position with one company, she heard and entire boardroom break into laughter when told she was waiting in the lobby.
Ms. Curtis found her way airborn by participating in the air racing circuit. And she continued to excel. Flying in a borrowed Spitfire, Ms. Curtis set a women’s record in the 100 km closed loop race in 1948. Later, in her own private plane, she raced nationally against all pilots, male and female.
Later in life, she also took it upon herself to tell the story of the ATA and wrote The Forgotten Pilots which was published in 1971. She wrote her autobiography, Lettice Curtis, in 2004.
In 2008, Ms. Curtis and fourteen other surviving women who flew for the ATA were honored by the British government for their service in the war with a special patch. (The men of the ATA were recognized as well.) “The Forgotten Pilots” had finally gotten their due.
Lettice Curtis, who earned her helicopter pilot’s license at the age of 77, died on July 21, 2014 at the age of 99.
Sources: Telegraph, The Guardian, The Daily Mail, and Wikipedia
(Image of Lettice Curtis stepping into the cockpit of a Spitfire sometime during World War II is courtesy of The Daily Mail)
Other women pilots featured on Obit of the Day:
Nadhezda Popova - One of the Sovet Union’s “Night Witches”
Betty Skelton - Dubbed “The Fastest Woman on Earth”
Patricia Wilson - Member of Philadelphia’s Civil Air Defense in WWII

rrriordan:

A ‘Code Name Verity’ story! @EWein2412

obitoftheday:

Obit of the Day: Air Pioneer

Lettice Curtis had her pilot’s license for only three years when she was recruited to Britain’s Air Transport Auxiliary (ATA) in 1940. The ATA’s sole mission was to ferry aircraft in and around the British Isles to make them accessible for members of the Royal Air Force. A shortage of male pilots forced the ATA to invite women to join, and Ms. Curtis was one of the first.

She was also the best. During her five years of service Ms. Curtis transported more than 1500 aircraft. Everything from Spitfire fighter planes, to the two-engine multi-purpose Mosquito, to the Lancaster four-engine bomber, had to be flown by Ms. Curtis, often solo and using only a map for navigation. Ms. Curtis was, in fact, the first woman in the world to qualify to fly four-engine bombers including the American B-17 Flying Fortress. She gained national attention in October 1942 when she met and shook hands with Eleanor Roosevelt and Clementine Churchill. 

Ms. Curtis was one of 166 women served in the ATA, which was dubbed ”Always Terrified Airwomen” by cynical journalists when the program was first expanded. The pilots came not just from the United Kingdom but also the U.S., The Netherlands, and Poland. Fifteen women lost their lives while serving in the ATA, a remarkably low death rate for pilots asked to fly at all hours and in all types of weather.a

After the end of World War II, Ms. Curtis hoped to fly in a professional setting but with the end of the war came the end of a need for women pilots. Like so many other women of the era Ms. Curtis was pushed aside to make room for the men returning from the front. While interviewing for a test pilot position with one company, she heard and entire boardroom break into laughter when told she was waiting in the lobby.

Ms. Curtis found her way airborn by participating in the air racing circuit. And she continued to excel. Flying in a borrowed Spitfire, Ms. Curtis set a women’s record in the 100 km closed loop race in 1948. Later, in her own private plane, she raced nationally against all pilots, male and female.

Later in life, she also took it upon herself to tell the story of the ATA and wrote The Forgotten Pilots which was published in 1971. She wrote her autobiography, Lettice Curtis, in 2004.

In 2008, Ms. Curtis and fourteen other surviving women who flew for the ATA were honored by the British government for their service in the war with a special patch. (The men of the ATA were recognized as well.) “The Forgotten Pilots” had finally gotten their due.

Lettice Curtis, who earned her helicopter pilot’s license at the age of 77, died on July 21, 2014 at the age of 99.

Sources: Telegraph, The Guardian, The Daily Mail, and Wikipedia

(Image of Lettice Curtis stepping into the cockpit of a Spitfire sometime during World War II is courtesy of The Daily Mail)

Other women pilots featured on Obit of the Day:

Nadhezda Popova - One of the Sovet Union’s “Night Witches”

Betty Skelton - Dubbed “The Fastest Woman on Earth”

Patricia Wilson - Member of Philadelphia’s Civil Air Defense in WWII

jtotheizzoe:

astrotastic:

Jesus Christ you guys.

If you wish to make waffles from scratch, you must first invent the universe.

therandomcub:

When digital tv info glitches are more accurate than the actual show info

therandomcub:

When digital tv info glitches are more accurate than the actual show info

humans-of-pdx:

"In high school I had this amazing mentor who was like a father figure to me and encouraged my acting. He was really supportive, but had this great way of calling me out directly when he knew I hadn’t done my best. He’d just say ‘What was that?’ He died around the same time that I finished college with an acting degree and suddenly all of this structure and support was gone from my life . Now I have this restless creative energy and these ideas for experimental theater that I want to do, but I’m having trouble getting started. It’s been this way for a while. It’s like when you get a new sketch book and you look at all those white pages…there’s so much pressure to do something great. I know a lot of artists will just open up the middle of the sketch book and just make something messy just to get it out of the way. I need to do something like that to get started. Just create something messy so I can get rid of the fear and move forward.”

humans-of-pdx:

"In high school I had this amazing mentor who was like a father figure to me and encouraged my acting. He was really supportive, but had this great way of calling me out directly when he knew I hadn’t done my best. He’d just say ‘What was that?’ He died around the same time that I finished college with an acting degree and suddenly all of this structure and support was gone from my life . Now I have this restless creative energy and these ideas for experimental theater that I want to do, but I’m having trouble getting started. It’s been this way for a while. It’s like when you get a new sketch book and you look at all those white pages…there’s so much pressure to do something great. I know a lot of artists will just open up the middle of the sketch book and just make something messy just to get it out of the way. I need to do something like that to get started. Just create something messy so I can get rid of the fear and move forward.”

humans-of-pdx:

"The hardest part is getting on stage and staying calm enough that you remember what you’re doing."

humans-of-pdx:

"The hardest part is getting on stage and staying calm enough that you remember what you’re doing."

awwww-cute:

I would have gotten more if he had stayed asleep

awwww-cute:

I would have gotten more if he had stayed asleep

porcelain-horse-horselain:

areyoutryingtodeduceme:

Also while I was waiting in a cab line yesterday I was having a very stressed and frantic phone call and the dudes standing in front of me were laughing about it and then one of them was like “wow you’re having a rough day” in the most recognizable voice ever and that’s when I realized H Jon Benjamin was laughing at my pain

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→ Mulan Teaches Us to “Be a Man” … Until You Have to be a Woman

unfriendlytaiwanesehottie:

frenchfryempress:

annethecatdetective:

shortazn97:

gunpowder-tea:

feminspire:

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And the more I think about it, the more real it becomes. Mulan spends virtually the whole movie concealing her sex, but projecting her physical and…

spearmintx:

why is it that were always told not to get tattoos at a young age because we “will regret it later on” when we are basically told to choose a career path by age 18? i’d rather be 40 years old with a tattoo that meant something to me when i was young than be 40 years old not wanting to get out of bed to go to a job that i hate because i was forced to decide on a career in my teens

shoegazevevo:

I hate this pseudo apathy that everyone has nowadays, like they think it ain’t cool to care about stuff. Well let me tell u son, there are lots of cool things to care about like dogs and space and holding hands and science and music and art and how the sky looks when the sun sets, and if u think you’re too cool to be passionate about something as incredible as this life then thats really sad and idk what to tell u

0trevskies:

rotg-art:

"Of course there aren’t any gay characters in animated movies! THEY’RE FOR KIDS!"

Yeah! Kids’ movies are supposed to be innoc-

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Because telling kids that they can love whoever they want is TOO TERRIFYING AND CONFUSING. But showing them murder, execution, death, frightening images, war, and bullying is just fine.

Not to mention 101 Dalmatians where a crazy woman wanted to SKIN 99 PUPPIES